Author Topic: NJ / Jersey City - 2008-21  (Read 8072 times)

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Offline Alison

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #44 on: June 21, 2019, 14:23 »
I am horrified by what happened here. I hope these people will face a long list of charges, and that this will go to court and result in a conviction.

The resident female at this nest was officially named Juliette at banding.  Her unbanded mate is known to some as Romeo.

Their three chicks (all girls) are banded BM/13, BM/17 and BM/18.

BM/13 is the one who is missing. BM/17 is in care at The Raptor Trust.

BM/18  is currently back in the nest.

From Ben Wurst two hours ago:

Hey all, Kathy Clark/NJDFW put BM/18 back on the roof. She was the only bird who didn't fledge early on Sunday. 17 is still at the Raptor Trust and now in a flight cage. 13 is still missing. Not much has changed. Sorry for any confusion!

Screen capture of the three beautiful girls from a week ago, by ospreychick. The one in the middle is the missing chick, BM/13.



One on the ledge yesterday, by Mason Najima.



BM/18 is currently fast asleep in the nest:



The best link for information and photos:

http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/education/falconcam/interact/
« Last Edit: June 21, 2019, 18:15 by Alison »

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #43 on: June 20, 2019, 18:34 »
I hope that the window washers are charged and convicted of this horrible act.  I also hope that the lost one is found safe (but know that is unlikely) and that the injured one makes it.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #42 on: June 20, 2019, 17:00 »
NJ investigating if window washers intentionally sprayed peregrine falcons off skyscraper
Scott Fallon / New Jersey Record / 19 June 2019

State wildlife authorities are investigating why window washers on Sunday sprayed a nest of endangered peregrine falcons living on a Jersey City skyscraper, causing several young falcons to fall from the roof of the 41-story building.  One young falcon remains missing and another that glided to the ground is being evaluated for injuries at a Morris County bird rehabilitation center, according to Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New Jersey. The birds, hatched in May, were about a week away from being able to fly, experts said.  "Everybody is shocked that this happened," said Cathy Malok, rehabilitation director for the Raptor Trust in Millington, where the stunned falcon was taken on Monday. "Even if you don't know that these birds are endangered, it's still a really lousy thing to do."  The state Division of Fish and Wildlife is investigating the incident, a spokesman said Wednesday.


Peregrine falcons have nested atop a Jersey City high-rise since 2000. This photo was taken before Sunday's incident. (Photo: Courtesy of Conserve Wildlife Foundation)
Note from TPC - this photo is not of a fledge-age chick, this chick probably about 10-12 days old, so this photo was taken well before Sunday's incident.


Falcons have called the roof of 101 Hudson St. home for nearly two decades, and they have a worldwide following due to a long-running webcam chronicling their activities.  The incident, which was partially recorded by the webcam, began around 8:45 a.m. Sunday when window washers entered the roof near the falcons' nest box.  Three young falcons that hatched in the box in May were close to being able to fly.  When the workers entered the area, adult falcons began "dive bombing" the men to defend their nest and young. Webcam footage shows water being sprayed on the nest and near a young falcon standing on the ledge. At least two young falcons jumped from the ledge.  "It clearly shows that the window washers were aware that these state endangered birds were present and were actively trying to remove them from the area so they could do their job," Conserve Wildlife Foundation wrote on its Facebook page.

A volunteer nest watcher visited the building Sunday and saw one of the young falcons on a lower ledge around the 36th floor. On Monday, a state conservation officer investigating the incident found another on the ground near a construction site. It was captured and transported to the Raptor Trust. One remains missing.   "They were about a week away from being able to fly," said Ben Wurst, habitat program manager for Conserve Wildlife. "It's a very sensitive time for them, so we try to make sure any interaction with people is extremely limited."

Peregrine falcons have had a resurgence in New Jersey.  In 2018, state researchers and wildlife advocates documented a record 40 nesting pairs after the species had been wiped out in New Jersey beginning in the 1960s. Twenty-eight pairs produced at least 75 chicks last year. Despite the progress, peregrine falcons are still listed as an endangered species in New Jersey  Falcons have lived on the roof of the 41-story office tower at 101 Hudson St. in Jersey City, now known as the Merrill Lynch Building, since 2000.

It is not known what company employs the window washers.  "I know the folks at the building are beside themselves," Wurst said. "These birds have been there for 20 years. Everybody at the building loves them, so it's very strange that this happened. It's not like no one knew they were there."  A spokeswoman for the building's owner, Mack-Cali, said the company is "saddened and dismayed" over the incident.  "Any time we employ a contractor to do work on or near the building’s roof, we are explicit in communicating the need to protect the falcons’ well-being and remain clear of the nest," Deidre Crockett, a company spokeswoman, said in a statement.

The falcon at the Raptor Trust is still in the center's critical care wing but is doing well, Malok said. It will be X-rayed to see if it has any broken bones.  As for the missing one, Malok hopes that it survived. "If you're a bird that can't fly, you don't want to be on the ground, especially in a busy place like Jersey City," she said.


There are more photos & a video from the banding
source: https://www.northjersey.com/story/news/environment/2019/06/19/nj-investigating-if-window-washers-sprayed-endangered-peregrine-falcons-off-skyscraper-jersey-city/1498850001/

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #41 on: June 20, 2019, 16:59 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

June 20

As viewers can tell you, a lot has happened since our last update. On June 3, Kathy Clark, Supervisory Zoologist/NJ Fish & Wildlife and CWF visited 101 Hudson St. to band the three 3 week old eyases. All three are females. This is the first successful brood for 41/AX, the nesting female, who has been here since 2015. She is now seven years old and a productive falcon! The three female eyases have been very well cared for since hatching. They have been well fed and brooded closely until they were large enough to keep warm on their own. All three were banded for future tracking: BM/13:1947-31877; BM/17:1947-31881; and BM/18:1947-31882.

All was going very well as they were able to leave and enter the Nestbox to explore the rooftop and building ledge. They could be seen flapping and jumping, all to help strengthen their flight muscles for their first flight when they fledge from the nest. Unfortunately, on Sunday, June 16, starting at approximately 8:45am, window washers entered the rooftop area (41st floor) where the falcon nestbox is located. The eyases (young falcons) were 5-6 weeks old and very close to fledging, so this is a very dangerous time for them to be disturbed. Pushing (by disturbing them) the birds to fledge early can be disastrous. Since they are unable to fly on their own and without much skill, they often land below or another ledge or end up on the streets below.

As soon as the workers entered the area, the adults could be heard calling and dive bombing them, to defend their eyrie (nest) and young. From the human disturbance, two eyases (BM/13 & BM/17) left the ledge on the 41st floor and one remained. At one point viewers noticed the remaining eyas was being sprayed with water from above, which may have been an attempt to drive or push that bird off the ledge, which luckily failed. Either way, it clearly shows that the window washers were aware that these state endangered birds were present and were actively trying to remove them from the area so they could do their job. The workers remained in that area for the majority of the day until we were able to reach engineers for the building to escort them from the area.

Later that day a volunteer nest watcher visited the area and saw one eyas on a lower ledge. On June 18, BM/17 was found on the ground and was captured and transported to The Raptor Trust. Currently the one eyas (BM/18) remains near the nestbox/ledge and the other (BM/13) has not been located.

This is now a law enforcement issue which is being investigated by NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife. We are deeply saddened by this and will keep you all updated on the status of these majestic birds.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #40 on: June 20, 2019, 16:58 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

May 21


The three eyases on Saturday, May 18 while being treated for trichomoniasis, a disease that is common in pigeons. Photo by Kathy Clark/ENSP.

I apologize for the delay in updates here! As you can all see, we have three healthy eyases!! This marks the first year that 41/AX has produced her own healthy brood of three young. The first hatched on 5/9 and then the remaining two hatched over the next 48 hours. As they have grown and demanded more attention, the remaining egg did not hatch. All young seem to have been getting plenty of care and have been well fed by both adults.

On Saturday, May 18 Kathy Clark, Supervisory Zoologist with the Endangered and Nongame Species Program visited 101 Hudson St. to medicate all three young for trichomoniasis, a disease that's common in pigeons. If left untreated, it can kill young falcons. They are treated with antibotics and will get a second dose when we visit 10 Hudson St. on June 3rd to band the young for future tracking. We'll be sure to keep you all updated on when the banding will occur and will be recording video of the banding to share afterwards.

When at 101 Hudson, we are hoping to adjust the angle of the IR light and stength of the illumination, since at night it is quite dim. Formerly lights on the roof helped to cast indirect light into the nestbox and now those lights are off, so we have less light and will try to turn up the intensity of the IR light to compensate. BW

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #39 on: June 20, 2019, 16:57 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

May 8


A pip in a falcon egg observed this week at a nest on a tower in coastal New Jersey

Hatch watch is here! We are just as anxious to see what happens at this nest as everyone who is watching online. As soon as an egg starts to hatch, we should hear peeping after the hatchling breaks through its shell and takes its first breath of air. I witnessed pipping at a nest that I visited at the beginning of the week to retrieve our "spy cam" that we use to ID the breeding adults. The hatchling was peeping like crazy as it was breaking through its shell with its egg tooth.

As we have stated before, egg laying at this nest was a bit abnormal this year. Kathy Clark believes that this could have been from an altercation with a rival female. If this occurs during egg laying, which is a very sensitive time, then the female will drop or loose an egg. There is no way to be certain about this, but it is our best guess.

    Egg #1 was laid on March 28/29. Today would be day 40 if she started to incubate right after laying, but they were on and off the egg for several days.
    Egg #2 was laid on April 3. Today is day 35 from laying.
    Egg #3 & 4 were laid on April 7 & 8. Today is day 30 & 31.

Typically falcons lay every other day, so the gaps between egg laying indicate that something happened. Usually falcons don't start incubating until they lay a full clutch and incubate for 29-32 days. With that said, we should see eggs hatching in the next day. We won't know how many eggs will successfully hatch until some start to hatch. If you hear some peeping or see signs of hatching, please post to our Interaction page! BW

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #38 on: June 20, 2019, 16:55 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

April 23


The male sits on the eggs while the female gets a break. The male sits on the eggs while the female gets a break.

All has been quiet at the nest here in Jersey City since our last update. The male and female have been trading off incubation dutiies of their four eggs to forage, feed and preen. The male does most of the foraging during this time, so when 41/AX gets a break to feed, he steps in to incubate. He is not banded and has a more vibrant color to the fresh of on the base of his bill, called a cere, around his eyes, and on his legs and feet. The female is banded and is not as vibrantly colored.

Hatching at this nest will be interesting, since the #1 egg was laid on 3/28 and they started to incubate more steadily on the 30th, so if we say that was the start date of incubation of that egg, then today would be day 24 of 32 days (when eggs begin to hatch). Egg #2 is on day 19 and the final two eggs are on days 14 & 15. Typically eggs are laid within a few days and then hatch within a few days, so all young are around the same age, so it'll be really interesting to see what happens when the first eggs hatch and those young get more attention from the adults.

At other nest sites throughout the coast, in partnership with NJ Fish & Wildlife, we are currently monitoring them for incubation. When visiting nests we install a small remote, motion-activated camera inside the nestbox. This captures video when the adults come and go from the nestbox, during incubation exchanges. The video captures their leg bands and allows us to identify the breeding pair and determine if they are the same pair or new at that nest. Most nests begin hatching in early May, so we will return to these nests in a couple weeks to check for hatching.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #37 on: June 20, 2019, 16:53 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

April 9

 

41/AX has been busy since our last update - she laid egg #3 on April 7, and # 4 on April 8. Peregrine clutches average 3 to 4 eggs, that are inclubated for about a month.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #36 on: June 20, 2019, 16:51 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

April 3



It appears that 41/AX laid an egg overnight, which could mean that she lost (or dumped) egg #2 & #3 during a possible altercation with a rival bird over the weekend. It's hard to know what actually happened, but there is no reason for a healthy adult to not lay a full clutch of eggs since we know there is plentiful food sources in this urban habitat. Time will tell if she lays another egg or not.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #35 on: June 20, 2019, 16:50 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

March 28



I know it's been a while since our last update. Not much has happened over the past two weeks, but overnight 41/AX laid the first egg! I knew something would happen soon. Yesterday evening I was watching and saw that she was hanging near the nestbox, which always seems to be a sign that she will be laying an egg soon. Low and behold, I tuned in this morning and saw the first egg! Egg-citing times for this pair. We shall see how they do this year after only hatching one egg to a malnourished nestling last year (though this gave us the opportuniuty to foster in orphans who all successfully fledged). Hopefully we'll see them produce a full brood of healthy young this year! BW

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #34 on: June 20, 2019, 16:49 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

March 12



March certainly roared in like a lion. Snow piled up on the rooftop and has lingered with the cool temperatures. Only a small mound is left today. This is quite common to see. I had a memory on Facebook from three years ago where we had to shovel snow on the roof to get to the nestbox to check on the nestbox and cameras... It is still a little early for eggs, but as you can see in the pinhole camera view, there is a very well defined scrape or shallow depression in the gravel. Last year the first egg was laid on 3/26 (4/17 in 2017), so we should start to see 41/AX in or around the nestbox more often as we get closer to egg laying.


Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #33 on: June 20, 2019, 16:48 »
From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

February 21

Both live feeds have been activated! Activity has been low, but we wanted to get these online since there could be some early season action, like what has happened over at the Union County Falcon Cam. Earlier this week the nesting female, BA/91 was outcompeted by another falcon (unbanded). She was still a young falcon and in her prime (hatched in 2015, from Rochester, NY). She survived the battle with the rival, but was found by Union County staff on the ground beneath the Courthouse with injuries to her wing and leg(s). She was transported to the Raptor Trust and will be examined by their veterinarian to determine the extent of her injuries. There has been evidence of high turnover rates of females in other eastern states. It might be true here in NJ and once we begin nest checks this spring, we shall learn more. BW

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: NJ / Jersey City - 2019 / 26 & V5
« Reply #32 on: June 20, 2019, 16:46 »
2019 NESTING SEASON

From the Jersey City Falcon Cam Nestbox News

February 15

Welcome to another year of the Jersey City Falcon Cam! This year marks the 19th year of the Falcon Cam, which we are proud to say is New Jersey's oldest and longest streaming wildlife focused webcam! In the day and age of technology and wildlife webcams galore, we're happy to keep this stream going to highlight wildlife conservation and management in urban areas of New Jersey. Life as an endangered species is fragile, but peregrines have thrived alongside humans and our development when they are given space and privacy to nest and raise young. Buildings like 101 Hudson St. have played a crucial role in the recovery of falcons in New Jersey to 40 known pairs. Partnerships with private building managers (that have suitable areas for nests to be established) who seek to support and benefit from nesting falcons will play a huge role in helping the population remain stable throughout the state. We hope to see the population inhabit more urban and suburban sites to maintain a robust population.


Believed to be the 101 Hudson's male from last year - he's unbanded

We visited 101 Hudson St. earlier this week to re-activate the camera(s). No falcons were present when we were there for a short time, but that was expected with the high winds out of the NW that day. Their nestbox was also full of snow from a storm the day before.

Today they were both captured on camera in the late morning and it looks like they were scraping in front of some snow in the nestbox. Here is video of the male entering the nestbox. The male also It appears that it's the same pair. 41/AX, a NY'er who will be 7 years old this summer. She started nesting here in 2015.The unbanded male (if it's the same male) claimed this territory in 2016. After the drama over the past couple years, it'll be interesting to see what happens this year. Will the pair produce their first full, healthy brood? Let us know your thoughts or questions over on our Interaction page!

There still hasn't been too much activity at the nest, but will will activate one live stream (PTZ cam) next week. Subscribe to our channel on YouTube to get notifications when we start a live stream! Please don't forget to share with your friends and family and donate to support this educational initiative! -Ben

Offline Kinderchick

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NJ / Jersey City - 2012 / 26 & V5
« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2012, 20:43 »
2012 NESTING SEASON

5 eggs confirmed at this nestsite, with hatching expected to begin early next week.

Info from the website...

While (the project's volunteer photographer, Mike) could confirm it is the same female as in the past few years, we still are unable to positively identify her and therefore know her history. The male's identity is known: *2/*6 was banded in 2003 at New York City's Riverside Church, and he's been at 101 Hudson since 2006.

Offline Alison

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NJ / Jersey City - 2010 / 26 & V5
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2010, 20:23 »
Banding day for the chicks was today. From the site:

May 25, 2010: Banding Day!

This morning biologist Kathy Clark made what has become an annual "pilgrimage" to the roof of 101 Hudson St. to band the peregrine chicks. All four were found to be in excellent health and quite robust. It was determined that all four chicks are female and about the same size, indicating they are all well fed and no one chick is particularly dominant at feeding time. It also means the parents are doing an excellent job providing enough food for all four growing chicks.


 
                                                                                      A parent stands guard