Author Topic: MA / Amherst - 2015-19  (Read 9373 times)

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Offline Alison

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MA / Amherst - 2019 / ? & ?
« Reply #43 on: May 03, 2019, 23:04 »
2019 NESTING SEASON

The webcam is not yet active at this site, but it is hoped that it will be live by May 10.

Back in 2015, the resident female at this site was from Sorel, Quebec, banded black/black S/71. She was a very beautiful falcon, very lightly marked, with her front being mainly white/cream.

She disappeared, and the following year there was a new female.

But now, four years later, S/71 has shown up, alive and well.



She was recently photographed on Mount Tom, Massachusetts, and identified by Dr. Tom French. It is so good to see her again.

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #42 on: July 22, 2015, 10:43 »
I'm beginning to wonder if this site has numerous cameras. For sure they can change the view often. I check this site and get to see the fledglings. Now I can see them almost side by side, one is preening.  :D

http://www.library.umass.edu/falcons

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #41 on: July 21, 2015, 05:58 »
I found the photo on FB and after clicking on a link, I saw more from yesterday. And after scanning down, I found links to more photos and videos to share.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153487431951323.1073741899.12436156322&type=3

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #40 on: July 21, 2015, 05:42 »
Thanks for these photos, Alison. This site does amazing captures, both photos and videos. As does some the other US sites. They continue to follow and capture the beauty of these amazing birds as they flourish into adulthood. Alison, please continue to share with us/me. I look forward to them.  :)

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #39 on: July 20, 2015, 17:29 »
Do we know who the photographer was GCG?  If you find it, I will added it to your post  :D

And it looks real to me ... often chicks will hang out together just like that ... and this photo reminds me of a really cute photo of Tupper peering around the edge of a building at me ...
I don't know where gemcitygemini got that photo from, TPC, but I would say that originally it came from the webcam earlier today.

The people at the site have a real interest in the birds, and when the fledglings are not in the nest, they will pan around the top of the library to try to find them.

I was watching the fledglings this morning too. Here are a few of my pics. The fledglings are on the wall which runs around the top of the library, which I believe is the highest building in Amherst.

 

Backed off a bit in the left pic; the edge of the nest box is visible on the right. In the pic on the right, part of the wall is visible, and the hills beyond.

 

Big Sister's first flight a few days ago was to the roof of the campus hotel. I have seen her fly, but have not yet seen Little Brother fly, although he was the first to "ledge", three or four days before his sister. He went for a walk along the top of the wall, and was gone for a while. When he came back, his sister yelled at him, and then reached over and gave him a kiss. These two are very close. For the last few nights, they have returned to the nest box to sleep in the closed-in part of the nest.

Big Sister is banded black/green 01/BE. Little Brother is banded black/green 76/BS. They have not been named, as far as I know.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #38 on: July 20, 2015, 15:54 »
Had to share this photo of the fledglings.

Do we know who the photographer was GCG?  If you find it, I will added it to your post  :D

And it looks real to me ... often chicks will hang out together just like that ... and this photo reminds me of a really cute photo of Tupper peering around the edge of a building at me ...

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #37 on: July 20, 2015, 13:26 »


Had to share this photo of the fledglings. Amazing capture. Is this for real, Dennis?

Offline RCF

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2015, 17:05 »
Here's a video of a feed from this morning.

https://youtu.be/I3alscs_EbM

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2015, 15:25 »
They certainly are growing. So hard for mom to cover them. They move, she moves.  :D

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2015, 12:25 »
The chicks are being fed. Both look good. If I had to venture a guess, I would say 1 male and 1 very large female. Females seem larger this year. Must be because of all the rain.

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2015, 12:43 »
Burdi, it would now seem that both chicks have been treated, which is good. Treating only one chick did not make sense.

From the site today:

With UMass Director of Animal Care & Attending Veterinarian Dr. Paul Spurlock we are using a systemic pesticide on the falcon chicks.

The pesticide is absorbed through the skin and is already effectively preventing further infestation of the chicks by the ectoparasites.

While treating the two chicks, we also collected and preserved in alcohol several examples of the parasites for identification.


Offline burdi

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2015, 18:11 »
I presume both chicks from this nest have now been treated.

The older chick was removed at 5:05 pm, and the younger chick was removed at 5:22 pm (upon return of the older one). The siblings were together again at 5:25 pm.

Mom fiercely tried to attack the intruder, and was panting heavily. I felt sorry for her of course, though thankful the chicks were receiving some much needed attention.

Offline Jazzerkins

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #31 on: June 10, 2015, 11:13 »
I so love watching the chicks being fed.   :D

Offline RCF

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #30 on: June 10, 2015, 10:21 »
Here's a video of the feed by skygirlblue.  They both look so much better!!  :)  I imagine whatever they treated the smaller one with (medicated dust I guess) will transfer onto the other chick, which is also good.

https://youtu.be/2MmKW7FKHY0

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #29 on: June 10, 2015, 09:45 »
The chicks were fed a few minutes ago:

 

 

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #28 on: June 10, 2015, 04:48 »
 ;D My thanks to TPC, Alison and burdi for your explanations clarifications, and photos. I am grateful for this info and now have a better understanding.

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2015, 23:58 »
June 4; two chicks.

 

 


Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2015, 23:46 »
This is Dad, nibbling on eggshell, and caring for the chick and eggs:

 



Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2015, 23:43 »
Pics of the first chick on June 2:

After hours on the nest, Mom took a momentary break (left); Dad immediately took over, but Mom was back in about a minute.

 

 

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #24 on: June 09, 2015, 23:38 »
Thanks for the update, burdi! It doesn't make sense to me that they would only treat the younger chick; both chicks need to be treated. I could understand taking them one at a time to be treated, to make it a little easier for the parents.

I hope by tomorrow there will be a more complete explanation/update.

Offline burdi

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2015, 20:40 »
Here is an update from “UMass Amherst Libraries” on Facebook:

“Falcon update: The youngest chick was removed from the nest, cleaned, sprayed and fed, and then returned to the nest. The two unhatched eggs were removed. They were infertile. Mama falcon protected the nest valiantly. The older chick slept through it all.”


Offline burdi

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2015, 20:02 »
They have now intervened - and only the larger chick was left in the nest.

Thank you, burdi. Do you know if they treated both chicks? I will be very interested to see what the veterinarian and wildlife officials have to say.

Hoping for the best for both chicks.


I believe they only treated the smaller chick; however, I could certainly have missed something - as just watching on and off. Perhaps they feel the treatment of one chick will help the other from close contact.

I did see a man place the smaller chick back in the nest - but did not see an egg being returned (or the other chick removed).

The parents here are so beautiful; I wish the best for this falcon family.


Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2015, 19:22 »
They have now intervened - and only the larger chick was left in the nest.

Thank you, burdi. Do you know if they treated both chicks? I will be very interested to see what the veterinarian and wildlife officials have to say.

Hoping for the best for both chicks.

Offline burdi

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2015, 18:27 »

I watched most of the last 3 feedings here. The smaller chick tried very hard to get food a few times, but almost always fell backward.

After one of the feedings Mom had to pull the little one back to her for brooding, since the poor chick simply could not get up.

They have now intervened - and only the larger chick was left in the nest.


Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2015, 17:36 »
The first chick hatched on June 2, and the second chick hatched on June 4. Both looked fine at that time.

And no, this isn't a solution if they have louse flies but it can make it easier to gauge effects of parasites or illness when you aren't having to visually compensate when there is more skin showing due to a natural growth spurt.  When  you watch them on camera - or in my case at the moment from still image screen captures, it is always important to know where they are in development.

And you are right Alison, brooding prey remains is not such a hot idea if parasite infestations are a problem.  One of the advantages of cold dry winters and exposed nestsites and nestboxes is that it tends to help keep these kinds of problems at bay.  Not always, but mostly.  It is also why we clean out the boxes in the spring and fall and change out the gravel ever few years.  But mostly cold, cold winters and even some nice baking hot summer weather helps to keep things dry and clean.

I totally understand about the bare patches of skin visible during a growth spurt; have seen that many times. But I think in this case it is something more. From its appearance, I do think this is an infestation of Hippoboscid flies.

And yes, cleaning out the nest boxes and changing the gravel really makes a difference. Statistically, it has been shown to increase hatch percentages and the survival rate of very young chicks.

It is difficult to see what is going on from very small pics. I have isolated the chicks from a couple of the pics in the hope that it will give a better idea.

The dark areas are actually dried blood. The area under the wing is usually the primary site of infestation (first pic). The second pic gives the back view, with more dark areas and a whole lot of missing down feathers.

 

For comparison purposes, here is a photo of Bugsy when he had a very severe infestation, which killed his two siblings:



Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2015, 16:23 »
The first chick hatched on June 2, and the second chick hatched on June 4. Both looked fine at that time.

I was wondering about the age because in the first week they outgrow the feathers they were hatched in (so to speak) and they often look quite bald (I have a photo of bald peregrine butts!) and bedraggled depending on mom, weather and whether their sibs poop on them (seriously).  Some look cute and white and adorable from day one, some not so much ... or ever.  These guys are in that stage so it will be interesting to see how they look in a week when their second set of downy feathers are in place. 

And no, this isn't a solution if they have louse flies but it can make it easier to gauge effects of parasites or illness when you aren't having to visually compensate when there is more skin showing due to a natural growth spurt.  When  you watch them on camera - or in my case at the moment from still image screen captures, it is always important to know where they are in development.

And you are right Alison, brooding prey remains is not such a hot idea if parasite infestations are a problem.  One of the advantages of cold dry winters and exposed nestsites and nestboxes is that it tends to help keep these kinds of problems at bay.  Not always, but mostly.  It is also why we clean out the boxes in the spring and fall and change out the gravel ever few years.  But mostly cold, cold winters and even some nice baking hot summer weather helps to keep things dry and clean.

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2015, 12:53 »
Alison - do you know when the chicks hatched? I ran through the thread quickly and I couldn't see anything to be able to gauge how old they are other than the photos ...

The first chick hatched on June 2, and the second chick hatched on June 4. Both looked fine at that time.

Originally, the first egg was laid on April 6, and not incubated for several weeks. It was incubated along with the other three eggs, but of course was long since not viable. It is the egg which is very dark in colour. The second egg (or the first of a new clutch, depending on one's point of view) was laid on April 29, the third egg on May 1, and the fourth on May 3.

I have not been able to observe many feedings, but as far as I can tell, both chicks have been fed normally. Both parents have been very attentive to the chicks' needs. The chicks have not been left alone or uncovered, which has made it more difficult to see how far this infestation has progressed in a very short time.

Mom has acquired a habit of brooding prey along with the chicks and unhatched eggs, which is not necessarily a good idea.

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #16 on: June 09, 2015, 09:51 »
Alison - do you know when the chicks hatched? I ran through the thread quickly and I couldn't see anything to be able to gauge how old they are other than the photos ...

Adult peregrines when they feed the chicks are usually pretty egalitarian - and the hungrier a chick is the more it protests which elicits a hardwired response from the parent, so if a chick gets more food a couple of times, inevitably, the other chick will get more food in proportion to how hungry s/he sounds.  If a chick isn't getting enough food there is likely something wrong with the chick not that the parents are neglecting or siblings are hogging all the food (though it does look like it often).  In all the years I have been banding peregrines, by the time they are banding age, they are in the same kind of condition - if one is a little light, they are all light, if they one is a heffalump, they are all heffalumps.  One thing we often forget (us too sometimes) that feedings take place day and night for most pairs and because of lighting for the cameras and/or the fact that we too must sleep sometime, chicks get fed and we don't see it.

Case in point - chick 2 at West Winnipeg right now is still a bit smaller than it's sibling - now at this stage that could be the start of the species' sexual dimorphism showing up in their development or it could just be that s/he is two days younger.  S/he however is not getting less food than his/her sibling and the chick looks to be pretty much at the same stage in their development despite the difference in age which at this point starts to mean less and less.  Another case in point (two points actually) was everyone's favourite Mistral - she had no problem whatsoever demanding and receiving her portion of any meal after about day two.  Her sister Taku was fine up until close to banding age when we notice that one chick was hanging back more during feedings - can't be sure it was Taku or Chinook/Hurricane too full for more - they were Trey's kids so no problem with food availability.

Just some of my thoughts ...

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #15 on: June 09, 2015, 05:52 »
Some FB comments about the chicks and their issues.

Mary Anne Reid Feed has started. This chick appears to have a serious parasite infestation (I didn't get a good look at chick #2). If this is true, they need to be treated immediately if you wish them to survive. I saw this at another nest several years ago and it killed 3 of the 4 chicks. Please consider intervention. Its an easy treatable problem.
.
UMass Amherst Libraries Thank you for your concern. Response from Richard Natthorst: The chicks have mites as do the parents.This is a perennial problem and short of insecticide there is not much we can do about it since they come in on the prey. This is not unusual and ...See More

Mary Anne Reid thank you for your reply!! Yes, I know that most chicks get mites..that's normal...but what we are seeing on these chicks is NOT normal. they may be infested with Hippoboscidae or the louse fly. Its generally not an issue with birds who can preen. ...See More

..
Mary Anne Reid I don't wish to be an alarmist, but if you want to save these chicks, they need to be treated ASAP. The other chick never turned over. that is not normal. Its probably because of weakness and anemia..I never got a good look at it, so don't know how ...See More

Donna Ferrari Hoping #2 chick makes it!

Marianne McLaughlin Downing is chck #1 sitting on top of chick #2? I watche them at 6:30 am and both were up and getting fed, but for this feeding, chick #1 seemed to block chick #2? Is that typical?
..

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2015, 05:42 »
not sure how many chicks, but one egg pushed aside. Appears to be windy. Feathers ruffled and nest moving from the wind
« Last Edit: June 09, 2015, 05:44 by gemcitygemini »

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #13 on: June 08, 2015, 15:59 »
Thanks TPC! Thanks Alison!

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2015, 15:46 »
I'm afraid I don't know any of the folks at Amherst or even in Massachusetts, but I have emailed a couple of folks that likely have much wider ranging contacts than I do.  And remember, this is a webcam, for every person you know that watches this cam, there will be 1,000+ more you don't know.  I am very sure that whoever runs the cam and/or the state wildlife agency have gotten a huge influx of calls and emails about the chicks - hard to miss that there is something amiss even if you might not know what is causing the problem.  If I hear anything I will let folks know.

Thank you for sending e-mails, TPC. I don't know the people in Amherst either, but I am sure that they have been informed about the problem. I believe the person to contact is Tom French.

Last year, Wildlife officials removed and treated the third chick from this nest, who was not doing well. Sadly, the little one did not survive. They also removed one of the four chicks from the Springfield nest, and that chick was taken to rehab.

So I hope they will provide assistance in this case. This is treatable, if caught early enough.

http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/wildlife/endangered/end_prog.htm

Offline The Peregrine Chick

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2015, 15:12 »
Alison, thank you for posting this information. That would explain why Mom was seen "Biting" at this chick's neck this morning before I made my post. TPC, can you contact anyone there with this info in the hope that something can be done to help these chicks? Or does nature have to take its course?

I'm afraid I don't know any of the folks at Amherst or even in Massachusetts, but I have emailed a couple of folks that likely have much wider ranging contacts than I do.  And remember, this is a webcam, for every person you know that watches this cam, there will be 1,000+ more you don't know.  I am very sure that whoever runs the cam and/or the state wildlife agency have gotten a huge influx of calls and emails about the chicks - hard to miss that there is something amiss even if you might not know what is causing the problem.  If I hear anything I will let folks know.

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2015, 14:34 »
Alison, thank you for posting this information. That would explain why Mom was seen "Biting" at this chick's neck this morning before I made my post. TPC, can you contact anyone there with this info in the hope that something can be done to help these chicks? Or does nature have to take its course?

Offline allikat

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2015, 14:09 »
Yikes - poor babes!  I hope they will intervene before it's too late.
Louse flies - nasty buggers!

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #8 on: June 08, 2015, 13:59 »
There is already so much damage. The younger, smaller chick was unable to reach for the food, so Mom went around to the other side and fed him.

 



Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #7 on: June 08, 2015, 13:55 »
This is Mom feeding the chicks:

 

 

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2015, 13:22 »
Had a close look at the chicks during a feeding a little while ago, and there are problems. The chicks are heavily infested with what I am pretty sure are Hippoboscidae. What these nasty little creatures do is chew on the chick's skin, creating areas of localized bleeding from which they drink the chick's blood. So although these chicks are being well fed and cared for, they are not receiving the benefit of the nutrients. The chicks become weak, and this kind of infestation can kill them.

For instance, two years ago at the Black Dog nest, there were three chicks. They were well fed and cared for, but did not thrive. By about nine days of age, two were dead. The third was still alive, but badly infested with Hippoboscidae. After these were removed, the chick did survive the damage which had been done. He was named Bugsy (rather unfortunate name, I thought).

Several years ago at Indy, there were two chicks, who had the same problem. One died, and the other, named Phoenix, just barely survived.

The Amherst chicks need to be treated; if they are not, it is likely that one or both of them will not survive. I hope that the Wildlife people will have them treated. I know that in the past they have been willing to help when there is a problem.

I hope they will do so again. I do not want to see this new, young pair lose their chicks.

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2015, 10:43 »
There are still 2 chicks and 2 eggs, one is not viable. They are hoping the 3rd hatches soon. Such a closeup view.

Offline GCG

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2015, 15:02 »
 ;D ;D Thanks for sharing this site, Alison. I love the close up cam.

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2015, 13:51 »
This nest was in turmoil earlier in the year. The webcam was not active until early April. According to the site, there was a new pair at the nest, both unbanded.

However, the first bird I saw at the nest was banded. She is Canadian, born in 2013 at Sorel, Quebec. She has a black/black band on the right leg (S/71) and a silver band on the left leg. She has very pale colouring for a peregrine, and she is very beautiful.

I also saw an unbanded second year peregrine attempt to land at the nest box beside her a couple of times, but she chased him off.

The new resident male is unbanded. The site states that he is two years old, but since he is in full adult plumage it is really not possible to be sure.

On April 6, one egg was laid. This egg was not incubated, and for some weeks it seemed as if there would be no chance of chicks this year.

Then, at the end of April, the banded female started laying eggs again. She laid three eggs, and she and the male incubated them along with the original egg.

Two days ago, the first chick hatched, and this morning a second new hatchling was visible on cam.

There is a great pic of both chicks on the site among the Tweets on the left of the live stream.

http://www.library.umass.edu/falcons

Offline Alison

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Re: Massachusetts / Amherst - 2015 / ? & ?
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2015, 00:05 »
On the left, Dad while he was in care; on the right, with his chicks in 2014.

 

Mom last year:

 

Their last two beautiful chicks:

 

Offline Alison

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MA / Amherst - 2015-19
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 23:17 »
2015 NESTING SEASON

The resident peregrines at this nest were one of the iconic pairs.

The male came from Rattlesnake Mountain in New Hampshire, born in 2001. His lifetime mate was also from New Hampshire, born at the Brady-Sullivan Tower in 2002. She arrived at the nest in 2003, still in her juvenile plumage.

Over the years, they raised 34 chicks together. Last year, they raised two beautiful male chicks.

In January of this year, the resident male was found injured in a snowbank. He was taken into care, and appeared to be improving, but while waiting to be transferred to a rehabilitation facility, he died.  :'(

http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2015/01/peregrine_falcon_that_made_uma.html

The resident female is also no longer at the nest. We do not know what happened to her, but she too is gone.

It is bad enough to lose one, but to lose both like this is very difficult.