Author Topic: OH / Toledo - University of Toledo - 2010-18  (Read 3641 times)

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Offline GCG

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OH / Toledo - 2018 / ? & ?
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2018, 15:58 »
2018 NESTING SEASON

There are 2 eggs at this nest site. Mom is probably picking up her take out  "sushi" order.  :P

http://www.utoledo.edu/nsm/envsciences/peregrine/fal-cam.html

Offline GCG

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Re: Toledo - University of Toledo - 2016 / Allen & Liadan
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2016, 15:15 »
There are now 5 eggs at this site.

click here to see the eggs

Offline GCG

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Offline GCG

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Re: Toledo - University of Toledo - 2016 / Allen & Liadan
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2016, 10:32 »
As of this morning, there are now 2 eggs.

Offline susha

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Re: Toledo - University of Toledo - 2016 / Allen & Liadan
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2016, 09:44 »
Thanks GCG!

Offline GCG

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Toledo - University of Toledo - 2016 / Allen & Liadan
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2016, 08:28 »
2016 NESTING SEASON

Posted on this site this morning, 1 egg!

http://www.utoledo.edu/nsm/envsciences/peregrine/fal-cam.html

Offline Alison

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OH / Toledo - University of Toledo - 2010-18
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2010, 15:58 »
2010 NESTING SEASON

ODNR's job of banding UT falcons for the birds (May 2010)

The wrath and beauty of nature were on display yesterday at the University of Toledo when state wildlife officials went to place identifying bands around the legs of three baby peregrine falcons.

Wearing hard hats, specialists from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources climbed the steps to the top of the 205-foot University Hall Tower, also known as the "bell tower," where the babies laid in a nest under the watchful eye of mama bird.  The purpose was to temporarily remove the offspring and take them to ground level, where they could be banded and have blood removed as part of preservation efforts. It was just as well the officials had their hard hats on.

As their heads peeped through the stone arches at the top of the tower, the mother falcon rose into the air and began swooping wildly down toward the wildlife officers. The father, who is smaller than the female bird, soon joined her and the two of them dive-bombed the officers for several minutes.  It's what Wildlife Management Supervisor J. Scott Butterworth has come to expect in his work to protect the threatened species.

"It takes you by surprise the first time it happens," Mr. Butterworth said. "But after that, you get used to it."

For yesterday's banding, the wildlife crew wrapped the chirping baby birds in blankets and took them to a table set up outside the university's Student Union. The birds - white, fluffy, and about the size of baseball caps - were banded one at a time and had blood drawn from their wings. The blood samples are banked for research.  Wildlife research biologist Jennifer Norris assured onlookers - a handful of bird enthusiasts and university employees - that the birds are not hurt in any way.

"It stresses them a little, but there's no trauma," Ms. Norris said.

Still, the biologist decided against banding one of the babies because it appeared too calm and listless, which she said was a sign of stress. Instead, the bird was returned with its brother and sister to the nest, and may be banded another day.

"I err on the side of caution," Ms. Norris explained.


http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100522/NEWS16/5220352

Photos by Dave Zapotosky.

 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2011, 22:39 by The Peregrine Chick »